Cod Kedgeree.

Khichdi – I remember my mum cooking Khichdi when I was a young child.

The combination and aromas of basmati rice with split moong dhal and ghee just brings fond memories of my childhood. This dish often cooked when someone at home is unwell, the mix of herbs and spices such as turmeric, cumin seeds, fennel seeds, black peppercorns and coriander are believed to enhance the medicinal values of this simple dish.

For me, the Khichdi was not just comfort food which was easily prepared and served in a bowl or a plate, but it was a way my Mother showcased her love in order to heal us when we fell ill. Inspite of the conventional medicines prescribed by the doctor, my Mother believed that her cooking has greater healing properties because it was cooked with thoughts and love.

Thank you, Ma. As I haven’t been feeling well in recent times, your cooking brings me comfort thoughts and I believe I’m healing.

For the first time, I cooked Khichdi or Kedgeree as it’s famously known in England with the nations favourite fish, Cod! I made it my own recipe and the outcome was absolutely fantastic! This recipe will be my go-to comfort, one pot, one bowl meal that is easily enjoyed at all seasons!

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Ingredients:
1 cup Brown Basmati Rice – washed and presoaked for 2 hours, drained
1/2 cup Split Moong Dhal – washed and presoaked for 2 hours, drained
1 cup of Cabbage – shredded
1 cup of Carrots – shredded
2 fillets of Cod ( or any fish of your choice ) – seasoned with salt and turmeric powder.
1 large Tomato – chopped
2 tablespoons of Ghee or Clarified butter
Hot water ( enough to cover the rice and lentils to cook )
Salt to taste
To fry:
1 teaspoon Cumin Seeds
1 teaspoon Fennel Seeds
1 teaspoon Turmeric powder
1 teaspoon Coriander powder
1/2 teaspoon Hing / Asafoetida
Thumb size Ginger – chopped
2 Cloves of Garlic – chopped
2 dried Red Chillies – chopped
1 medium-sized Red Onion – chopped
Serve with
Hardboiled Eggs
Greek Yogurt or Pickle
Method :
  1. Melt the ghee in medium heat in a non – stick saute pan. Fry the cumin and fennel seeds till it begins to splutter.
  2. Add the chopped onions, ginger, garlic, chillies to this and fry till the onions soften.
  3. Then add the rice and moong dhal to this mixture.
  4. Now add the turmeric powder, coriander powder, hing and stir until well incorporated. You want to fry this for a further 2 minutes in medium heat just to allow the spices and flavours to work its’ magic.
  5. Add the shredded cabbage and carrots and mix in.
  6. Now you pour enough water, just to cover the top of the rice and lentils. This has to cook in medium heat with the lid on for 20 minutes. You can half season it with salt and add later if needed. But allow it to cook and just keep an eye that it needs water to cook.
  7. 20 minutes later, remove the lid and add the fillets of cod and chopped tomatoes. You want to cover it, give it a gentle burial into the rice. Cook it further for 15 minutes.
  8. Taste for salt before you turn off the heat.
  9. And your Cod Kedgeree is ready to be served with any salad of your choice. I enjoyed mine with hardboiled eggs, yoghurt and red chillies!

 

Spice, sour and salty. Sweet, tangy and creamy. Let’s talk food!

Food – we all love it.

From home cooked meals to fine dining. Speak about food and you will definitely get anyone’ attention.

I’m a Malaysian and we Malaysians love our food! In fact, we greet you by saying, ” Hi, Sudah makan kah belum?”  – “Hi, Have you ate, already?”. It’s a simple theory, really. If you have eaten and the reply is Yes, then we know you are well but if it’s a No.. it’s time we ate before we uttered another word!

Growing up in Malaysia gave me a childhood which celebrated an array of cuisines – Indian, Malay, Chinese, Thai and the introduction of the far, far…West.

Most dishes were cooked at home as this was the supreme ruler of the household. No matter what time you came home, food will be served!

Of course, occasionally we ate out at family-style restaurants or kept it simple by visiting our Colonel Kentucky (this was the beginning and end to the western food influence of my childhood) downtown.

Regardless of the cuisine, we made sure we ate together! This is the importance of food and the role it plays in Asian culture. We don’t need a special occasion or festive season to gather around the table to enjoy a nice meal with the family. And, if you are a friend, you need no invitation!

Because it’s about sharing. Sharing a meal with another member of your family and friends. If you have travelled to Malaysia, Singapore, India, China or Japan, you will notice how food is served to the oldest and the youngest persons in the table first before filling their own plate, even at a restaurant. This is what food means to us. Respect and appreciation for the bonds we share amongst people we love and care, regardless of age and gender.

But when it came to food, to us, it was just not about eating. There’s more… something magnificent about the entire experience of dining, whether if you are seated on a table or on the matted floor, on fine china or banana leaves – food always brought people together and to me, it brings back the fondest of memories.

The greatest of cultural diversities and wonders of traditions. What better way than the sound of laughter that fills the air, that could possibly replace this form of happiness. And what better way to convey your identity if not by the simplest contraction known and enjoyed by us from the beginning of time.

I hope you try my recipes and enjoy them as much as I do. So, feel free to join me for a meal and a conversation. We shall speak about food!

 

 

 

Christmas – Greetings, Food and I!

 

I would write .. but they say a picture speaks a thousand words. And I’ve given you lovely folks six for indulgence purpose. The fourth picture being the ultimate Cherry on Ice xxx

Please read between these images (I spent the night with both Santa and Snowman).

I wish all of you a Wonderful Christmas, because it’s never too late for Seasonal Greetings.

Osaka-jo Castle in Chuo-ku, Osaka, Japan.

One of Japan’s most famous and most important landmarks, built in 1583 by Hideyoshi Toyotomi.

Represents the unity of the Japanese. I was extremely lucky to visit during a festival of music, food and taiko drummers.

Osaka Jo - Chuo Ku

Dancing in scorching heat. I was dancing too, the music was so catchy 🙂

A boat ride around the moat. Best times of the year during the Cherry Blossom (Hanami viewing) in early April.

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Takoyaki – Octopus Balls, a popular street food especially in Osaka. Made with batter, octopus, pickled ginger and spring onions. Served with takoyaki sauce, kewpie ( Japanese mayonaise) and Katsuobushi otherwise known as Bonito, shavings of smoked and dried skipjack tuna. Oishii!!

An owl and an eagle, not one for a poser!

My first blog!

Hi everyone! Well, I am very new to this blogging society. I’ve read a lot of other’s blogs in my lifetime but when it came to owning one myself, it was an inner debate which I just surrendered to – eventually.

So, a little about me. My name is Sharlinie, Malaysian by birth and currently reside in the UK. I am a writer and currently on the verge of finishing my first book titled Courage, which I am going to publish next year – 2018. ( Celebrations on the cards!!! )

I wanted to get it published this year, ( I’ll just keep it short..)  but being a perfectionist, a book enthusiast, avid reader and with some wise editorial advice, I am perfecting my baby as it grows!

This website is about anything and everything. Sharing a lot of my travels, food and recipes, family traditions and customs of my birth country and adopted country.

So, please stay with me and feel at home while I type away my daily anecdote. You are always welcome to join me with a nice cup of hot tea or coffee and pen down your thoughts, opinions, feedbacks or even if it’s just to drop a – Hi!